Annotated Bibliography: Approaches to psycho-social support in protracted crises

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Helpdesk Query:

Provide an annotated bibliography of up to 15 key resources, on providing psycho-social support for children, teachers and other school staff, that may be useful in helping staff to engage in policy dialogue and programming.

Summary:

This annotated bibliography highlights 14 key resources drawn from the studies which underpinned the questions answered in this helpdesk report. Some selection criteria included the source’s relevance to the query, recent publication, contextual relevance and methodology. The sources below are grouped into three sets: those selected based on their relevance to the Syrian context; those selected based on their focus on evidence of best practice psycho-social support in conflict/post-conflict settings; toolkits and guidelines to support decision-making and practitioners.

This report maps the education response to the crisis in Syria and is current as of December 2013. Data on the current crises and education provision offered in Syria as well as in Turkey, Jordan, Lebanon, Northern Iraq/Kurdistan and Egypt presented in this report is based on a survey of the International Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE) members and partners, and information shared by members of the INEE Working Group on Minimum Standards for education in emergencies and the INEE Steering Group.

In addition to desk based research, 34 respondents representing 27 different agencies undertook a survey. Respondents reported working or the intention to work in Syria and seven neighbouring countries involved in humanitarian response related to the Syrian conflict. Information was shared on work completed since the beginning of the conflict as well as work planned for 2014. The greatest number of respondents (50.0%) worked or were planning to work in Lebanon, with Jordan as the second most common location for educational interventions (35.3%). 85.3% of respondents indicated that they had been providing educational humanitarian services in 2013, with 35.3% and 82.4% reporting to have worked in 2012 or planning to work in 2014, respectively.

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