Urban Health

Dr Helen Elsey is from the Nuffield Centre for International Health and Development, University of Leeds. In this HEART Talks she talks through the urban health HEART reading packs that she has put together with Dr Siddharth Agarwal from the Urban Health Resource Centre in India. The three reading packs are: A) Data and evidence,… Read more




Comparative advantages and disadvantages of “push” and “pull” mechanisms in pharmaceutical management

In pharmaceutical management, distribution schemes for medicines can be defined as “push” or “pull” systems. In a pull system, each level of the system determines the types and quantities of medicines needed and place orders with the supply source. In a push system, supply sources determine the types and quantities of medicines to be delivered… Read more




Disability inclusion Topic Guide

This topic guide summarises some of the most rigorous available evidence on the key debates and challenges of disability inclusion in development and humanitarian response. Disability does not necessary imply limited wellbeing and poverty. Yet there is growing evidence that the estimated one billion people with disabilities face attitudinal, physical and institutional barriers that result in… Read more




Ten arguments for why gender should be a central focus for universal health coverage advocates

To make universal health coverage (UHC) truly universal we need an approach which places gender and power at the centre of our analysis. This means we need a discussion about who is included, how health is defined, what coverage entails and whether equity is ensured. To celebrate Universal Health Coverage Day RinGs has put together… Read more




Who gains, who loses and how: Leveraging gender and class intersections to secure health entitlements

This paper argues that a focus on the middle groups in a multi-dimensional socioeconomic ordering can provide valuable insights into how different axes of advantage and disadvantage intersect with each other. It develops the elements of a framework to analyse the middle groups through an intersectional analysis, and uses it to explore how such groups… Read more




Universal access: making health systems work for women

Universal coverage by health services is one of the core obligations that any legitimate government should fulfil vis-à-vis its citizens. However, universal coverage may not in itself ensure universal access to health care. Among the many challenges to ensuring universal coverage as well as access to health care are structural inequalities by caste, race, ethnicity… Read more




Making health insurance work for the poor: Learning from the Self-Employed Women’s Association’s (SEWA) community-based health insurance scheme in India

How best to provide effective protection for the poorest against the financial risks of ill health remains an unanswered policy question. Community-based health insurance (CBHI) schemes, by pooling risks and resources, can in principal offer protection against the risk of medical expenses, and make accessible health care services that would otherwise be unaffordable. The purpose… Read more




Gender equity and universal health coverage in India

This article introduces a Series in The Lancet in which Srinath Reddy and colleagues call for universal health-care coverage in India, and outline why the development of national health provision is both timely and necessary. Without question, India has reached the right point in time to undertake universal health-care coverage, a move that is likely to… Read more




What does universal health coverage mean?

The recent UN General Assembly resolution calling for universal health coverage (UHC) was testimony to the continuing high-level political commitment to achievement of global health goals—an achievement that has the potential to transform health systems, especially for the poorest people. Fulfilment of this potential, however, requires a clear definition of the term UHC otherwise it… Read more




Understanding CBHI hospitalisation patterns: a comparison of insured and uninsured women in Gujarat, India

Community-based health insurance has been associated with increased hospitalisation in low-income settings, but with limited analysis of the illnesses for which claims are submitted. A review of claims submitted to VimoSEWA, an inpatient insurance scheme in Gujarat, India, found that fever, diarrhoea and hysterectomy, the latter at a mean age of 37 years, were the… Read more




The men’s health gap: men must be included in the global health equity agenda

In most parts of the world, health outcomes among boys and men continue to be substantially worse than among girls and women, yet this gender-based disparity in health has received little national, regional or global acknowledgement or attention from health policy-makers or health-care providers. Including both women and men in efforts to reduce gender inequalities… Read more




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